Last edited by Mora
Monday, May 18, 2020 | History

5 edition of Ulster folklore. found in the catalog.

Ulster folklore.

Andrews, Elizabeth F.R.A.I.

Ulster folklore.

by Andrews, Elizabeth F.R.A.I.

  • 392 Want to read
  • 7 Currently reading

Published by Norwood Editions in [Norwood, Pa.] .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Ulster (Northern Ireland and Ireland)
    • Subjects:
    • Folklore -- Ulster (Northern Ireland and Ireland),
    • Ulster (Northern Ireland and Ireland) -- Social life and customs.

    • Edition Notes

      Reprint of the 1913 ed. published by E. Stock, London.

      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsGR148.U5 A5 1974
      The Physical Object
      Paginationxiii, 121 p.
      Number of Pages121
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL5052011M
      ISBN 100883050064
      LC Control Number74013592
      OCLC/WorldCa995014

      Step back in time and experience what life was like in Ulster over years ago. Wander Ulster Folk Museum's rolling countryside and bustling town filled with authentic, period ’ll find an old-time picture house, post office and corner shop on streets inhabited by people in period your hand at basket weaving or see a blacksmith hard at work. Books shelved as ulster-scots: The Scotch-Irish: A Social History by James Graham Leyburn, The Penguin Atlas of British and Irish History by Barry W. Cun.

      item 3 Ulster Folklore by Elizabeth Andrews (English) Perfect Book Free Shipping! - Ulster Folklore by Elizabeth Andrews (English) Perfect Book Free Shipping! $ Free shipping. No ratings or reviews yet. Be the first to write a review. Best Selling in Nonfiction. See all.   The Red Hand of Ulster. The Red Hand of Ulster (Irish: Lámh Dhearg Uladh) is an Irish Gaelic symbol used in heraldry [1] to denote the Irish province of is shown in two forms, as a dexter (right) hand (used as a symbol in Ulster) and a hand baring a blue or red sinister looking cross (used in the coats of arms of baronets).It is an open hand coloured red, with the fingers pointing.

      The Ulster University Library has a growing collection of electronic books, also known as eBooks. There are over 5, eBook titles on the Library Catalogue, and we are continually adding individual e-book titles where they meet the requirements of teaching and research at Ulster.. eBooks are available across all subject areas, and can be accessed from anywhere at any time. The Ulster Historical Foundation’s online bookstore lists all our publications and also titles of local interest from other publishers. Visit for a wide range of Irish and Scots-Irish history and genealogy books as well as eBooks and DVDs on Irish and Scots-Irish culture, folklore, music and poetry, Ulster-Scots Guides and promotional materials & much more.


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Ulster folklore by Andrews, Elizabeth F.R.A.I. Download PDF EPUB FB2

Ulster Folklore contains several papers arguing for the existence of a race of small people in Europe who may or may not have been fairies, or have influenced the folklore traditions of the 'little folk.' For further reading, consider Fians, Fairies and Picts/5(4).

Originally published inthis seminal work traces the history of superstitions, legends and myths in Ulster, especially the folk tales of fairies, dwarves and giants/5. Ulster Folklore [Andrews, Elizabeth] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Ulster Folklore/5(4).

T he population of Ulster is derived from many sources, and in its folklore we shall find traces of various tribes and people.

I shall begin with a tale which may have been brought by English settlers. In "Folklore as an Historical Science" Sir G.

Laurence Gomme has given several variants of the story of the Pedlar of Swaffham and London Bridge. Ulster Folklore (Originally Published ) Fairies and their Dwelling-places Ballymagreehan Fort is a short distance from Castlewellan, near the Newry Road. It is a small fort, and on the top we saw the narrow entrance to the souterrain.

Passing down through this, we found ourselves in a short passage, or chamber, which led us to another. Fairies and their dwelling-placesA day at Maghera, Co. LondonderryUlster fairies, Danes, and PechtsFolklore connected with Ulster raths and souterrainsTraditions of dwarf races in Ireland and in SwitzerlandFolklore from DonegalGiants and dwarfsThe Rev.

Willim Hamilton, D. DPages: Folklore From Donegal (Originally Published ) THE stories current among the peasantry are varied, especially in Donegal, where we hear of giants and fairies, of small and tall Finns, of short, stout Firboigs or Firwolgs, of Danes who made heather ale, and sometimes of Pechts with their large feet.

R ULSTER FOLKLORE such an idea. The fairies, according to her, were indeed small people, but no mushroom could give them shelter. She described them as about the size of children, and as far as I can ascertain from inquiries made in many parts of Ulster and Munster, this is the almost universal belief among the Size: 6MB.

The Ulster-Scots History and Folklore has 1, members. This is a group where history and folklore loving like minded people can come together learn. Folklore, Supernatural The Supernatural in Ulster Scots Literature and Folklore Project was funded by MAGUS/Department of Culture, Arts and Leisure.

Its main objective was to produce an open access, online resource, ‘The Supernatural in Ulster Scots Folklore and Literature Reader’.

The Four Cycles of Irish Mythology. The tales are, in the main, related in four cycles which sometimes are intertwined, The Mythological Cycle, the Ulster Cycle, the Fenian Cycle and the Historical Cycle. There are also other sources such as the Book of Hy Maine, The Great Book of Lecan, the Yellow Book of Lecan and also the Book of Ballymote.

Ulster Folklore Contents: Fairies and their dwelling-places -- A day at Maghera, co. Londonderry -- Ulster fairies, Danes, and Pechts -- Folklore connected with Ulster raths and souterrains -- Traditions of dwarf races in Ireland and in Switzerland -- Folklore from Donegal -- Giants and dwarfs -- The Rev.

William Hamilton, D.D. Language: English. Print book: English: [1st ed.]View all editions and formats: Rating: (not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first. Subjects: Folklore -- Ireland -- Ulster.

Folklore. Ireland -- Ulster. Additional Physical Format: Online version: Andrews, Elizabeth, F.R.A.I. Ulster folklore. New York: Dutton, (OCoLC) Document Type: Book. Full text of "Ulster songs and ballads" See other formats "^ULSTER SONGS AND BALLADS ^~ 5 PADRIC GREGORY BOUGHT WITH THE INCOME OF THE SAGE ENDOWMENT FUND THE GIFT OF HENRY W.

SAGE Cornell University Library PR G82 Ulster songs and ballads, 3 Cornell University Library The original of tliis bool. Ulster Folklore summary: Ulster Folklore summary is updating. Come visit sometime to read the latest chapter of Ulster Folklore. If you have any question about this novel, Please don't hesitate to contact us or translate team.

Hope you enjoy it. About this Item: Ulster Folk and Transport Museum, Belfast, Soft cover. Condition: Good.

pp Light volume - shipping charge will be reduced at processing stage. Contents: The introduction of engine power in the Co. Down fisheries; Children's games in County Down a century ago; A study of an early twentieth century Temperance Society in Northern Ireland; The use of the term'Clachan.

Ulster Folklore contains several papers arguing for the existence of a race of small people in Europe who may or may not have been fairies, or have influenced the folklore traditions of the 'little folk.' For further reading, consider Fians, Fairies and Picts/5(4).

In The Ulster Cycle, Randy Lee Eickhoff translates Ireland’s ancient mythology into vital, accessible and novelistic retellings. Enter the world of pre-Christian Ireland, when warriors fought from chariots, Druids provided the mystical answers to the universe, and men and women believed strongly in magic.

Books in the Series; About the Author. The Ulster Cycle provided material for Irish writers of the Gaelic revival around the turn of the 20th century. Augusta, Lady Gregory's Cuchulain of Muirthemne () retold most of the important stories of the cycle, as did Eleanor Hull for younger readers in The Boys' Cuchulain ().

A Book of Folk-Lore, by S. Baring-Gould (HTML at ) Custom and Myth, by Andrew Lang (Gutenberg text and illustrated HTML) The Fairy Mythology, Illustrative of the Romance and Superstition of Various Countries, by Thomas Keightley (HTML at )."Ulster Folklore" by F.R.A.I.

Elizabeth Andrews. Published by Good Press. Good Press publishes a wide range of titles that encompasses every genre. From well-known classics & literary fiction and non-fiction to forgotten−or yet undiscovered gems−of world literature, we issue the books that need to be : Good Press.Ulster Folklore by Elizabeth Andrews,available at Book Depository with free delivery worldwide.